Faecal microbiota transplantation for treatment of recurrent or refractory Clostridioides difficile infection in Hong Kong
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AbstractIntroduction: Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infection globally, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a promising option for recurrent and refractory CDI. This study aimed to assess the safety, efficacy, and feasibility of FMT for CDI in Hong Kong.

Methods: We conducted a single-centre, retrospective study for all consecutive cases of recurrent or refractory CDI who underwent FMT from 2013 to 2018. Clinical demographics, outcome, and safety parameters were collected.

Results: A total of 24 patients with recurrent or refractory CDI (median age 70 years, interquartile range=45.0-78.3 years; 67% male) were included. Over 80% had been recently hospitalised or were long-term care facility residents. Faecal microbiota transplantation was delivered by feeding tube in 11 (45.8%), oesophagogastroduodenoscopy in eight (33.3%), and colonoscopy in six (25%) of the patients. Resolution of diarrhoea without relapse within 8 weeks was achieved in 21 out of 24 patients (87.5%) after FMT. No deaths occurred within 30 days. The FMT was well tolerated and no serious adverse events attributable to FMT were reported.

Conclusion: Our results confirm that FMT is a safe, efficacious, and feasible intervention for patients with refractory or recurrent CDI in Hong Kong. Given the increasing disease burden and the lack of effective alternatives in Hong Kong for difficult-to-treat cases of CDI, we recommend that a territory-wide FMT service be established to address increasing demand for this treatment.
All Author(s) ListLui, Wong, Lau, Chan, Cheung, Li, Chin, Tang, Ching, Lam, Chan, Wu, Sung, Chan, Ng
Journal nameHong Kong Medical Journal
Year2019
Month6
Volume Number25
Issue Number3
Pages178 - 182
ISSN1024-2708
LanguagesEnglish-United Kingdom

Last updated on 2020-05-06 at 00:45