Examining the effects of active versus passive parental support on children’s activity behaviors using proximity tagging data from accelerometers
Refereed conference paper presented and published in conference proceedings


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AbstractTitle
Examining the effects of active versus passive parental support on children’s activity behaviors using proximity tagging data from accelerometers

Objective:
The Bluetooth-based proximity tagging feature of ActiGraph accelerometers can be used to capture interactions between parent and child, in terms of their physical activity behaviors, while they are in close proximity. In this study, we defined parents’ “passive support” as time parents are sedentary, and in close proximity with a child who is doing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Whereas “active support” was defined as time when parents and child are engaging in MVPA at the same time and in close proximity. The effects of both passive support and active support on students’ overall MVPA was examined.

Method:
A cross-sectional design was used in this study. Data was collected from 207 pairs of parent-child dyads. Children in this study were aged between 6 to 11 years (Grades 1 to 5). Parents and children wore wGT3X-BT during a seven-day period with the proximity tagging function turned on. Proximity data was used to compute parents’ passive and active support to children’s physical activity. The strength of relation between these two variables and children’s 7-day MVPA was examined using multiple regression, adjusting for students’ grade level.

Results:
154 dyads provided sufficient wear time (i.e., at least 3 weekdays and 1 weekend day, 8 hours per day) and their data were used for the main analysis. The model was significant with an R-squared of .160. Both passive (beta = .238, 95% CI [.051, .218], p = .002) and active support (beta = .286, 95% CI [.103, .329], p < .001) were found to be significantly related to children’s overall MVPA.

Conclusions:
Our results suggested that parents’ being supportive by merely being present while their children engage in physical activity, or by engaging in co-activity with their children, are related to overall activity levels of their children. Engaging in co-activity may have additional positive outcomes such as better parent-child relationships, and therefore should be promoted.
All Author(s) ListHa A, Ng JYY, Zhang J, Chan CHS
Name of ConferenceInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) Annual Meeting 2019
Start Date of Conference04/06/2019
End Date of Conference07/06/2019
Place of ConferencePrague
Country/Region of ConferenceCzech Republic
Year2019
Month6
LanguagesEnglish-United States

Last updated on 2019-11-06 at 16:51