Difference between brain activations for self- and cue-initiated movements in people with Parkinson’s disease
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AbstractObjective: To compare the brain activation patterns during self- and cue-initiated movements in healthy subjects and people with Parkinson's disease (PD).

Background: It has been reported that people with PD had difficulties in performing self-initiated movements and the application of external cues improved the speed and/or amplitude of the movements. It is hypothesized that, due to dysfunctions of the basal ganglia, PD patients use the dorsal visual pathway, including the parietal cortex, pre-motor cortex and cerebellum, to replace the supplementary motor area-basal ganglia cortical pathways. Previous studies reported that PD patients could perform well-learnt sequential finger movements by activating more brain areas than healthy subjects (Wu et al. 2005). However, no study has compared the brain activation patterns between self- and cue-initiated movements in patients with PD.

Methods: Twelve PD patients and seventeen healthy subjects were instructed to perform finger tapping with their left index finger in 2 conditions while their brain activity was recorded by fMRI. During the self-initiated condition, subjects had to tap their index finger at an interval of 3s to 5s. During the cue-initiated condition, subjects had to make a tap when they saw a “+” on the computer screen. Data were acquired in self-initiated, cue-initiated, and rest conditions using a block design. There were 5 self- and 5 cue-initiated blocks and 10 rest blocks.

Results: During self-initiated movements, PD patients activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the declive of the cerebellum whilst healthy controls activated the supplementary motor area and the declive of the cerebellum (corrected, p<0.05). During cue-initiated movements, PD patients activated the inferior parietal lobe and mid-cingulate cortex and healthy controls activated the supplementary motor area and the culmen and declive of the cerebellum (corrected, p<0.05).

Conclusions: PD patients had hypoactivation of the supplementary motor areas during self-initiated movement. In both self- and cue-initiated movements, PD subjects activated the cingulate cortex, suggesting that they used more attention than healthy subjects to perform both types of movements. The findings suggest that PD patients may activate the attention network to compensate for their disrupted basal ganglia-cortical pathways in generating body movements.
All Author(s) ListM.K. Mak, V. Cheung, D. Wang, C. Wong, Z.L. Lu, L. Shi, W. Lou, V. Mok, W.C.W. Chu
Name of Conference19th International of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders in Congress
Start Date of Conference14/06/2015
End Date of Conference18/06/2015
Place of ConferenceSan Diego
Country/Region of ConferenceUnited States of America
Journal nameMovement Disorders
Proceedings TitleMovement Disorders Supplement: Abstracts of the Nineteenth International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders
Year2015
Month6
Volume Number30
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.
PagesS17 - S18
ISSN0885-3185
eISSN1531-8257
LanguagesEnglish-United Kingdom

Last updated on 2021-18-02 at 23:57