Can computer-assisted cognitive remediation improve employment and productivity outcomes of patients with severe mental illness? A meta-analysis of prospective controlled trials
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AbstractBackground: Computer-assisted cognitive remediation (CACR) has been demonstrated to enhance cognition of patients with severe mental illness (SMI). Patients with improved cognitive skills may find it easier to be employed, and the ability to maintain employment is an important sign of recovery. Aim: To assess whether CACR is an effective method to enhance work-related outcomes in patients with SMI. Method: Prospective controlled trials evaluating CACR on productivity outcomes were systematically identified from the OVID databases. Employment rates, total days of work in a year, and total annual earnings were defined as the productivity outcomes. Results: Nine trials were published between 2005 and 2014 and were conducted in the United States, Germany, Italy, Singapore and Japan. A total of 740 patients with mean age of 36.4 years were included. The duration of CACR ranged from 2 months to 2 years, and the patients were followed-up from 1 year to 3 years. Patients receiving CACR showed 20% higher employment rate (95% CI=5%-35%), worked 19.5 days longer in a year (95% CI=2.5-36.6 days), and earned US$959 more in total annual earnings (95% CI=US$285 to US$1634) than those not receiving CACR. Conclusion: CACR can enhance productivity outcomes for patients with SMI, including higher employment rate, longer duration of work and higher income. The economic benefit of CACR can enhance the quality of life for patients with SMI, and may reduce financial burden on the health and welfare system. Therefore, CACR can be recommended and incorporated into regular vocational rehabilitation programs.
All Author(s) ListChan J.Y.C., Hirai H.W., Tsoi K.K.F.
Journal nameJournal of Psychiatric Research
Year2015
Month9
Day1
Volume Number68
PublisherPergamon Press Ltd.
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
Pages293 - 300
ISSN0022-3956
eISSN1879-1379
LanguagesEnglish-United Kingdom
KeywordsComputer-assisted cognitive remediation, Employment rate, Productivity outcomes, Schizophrenia, Severe mental illness

Last updated on 2020-01-12 at 00:58