How time flies: The effects of conversation characteristics and partner attractiveness on duration judgments in a social interaction
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AbstractA theory of information processing proposed by Wyer and Srull (1989) is used to conceptualize the characteristics of a get-acquainted conversation that influence perceptions of its duration. These perceptions are partly determined by whether persons focus their attention on things their partner says or on things they personally say, and this, in turn, depends on their partner's physical attractiveness. Participants' estimates of a conversation's duration immediately after it occurs are based on their enjoyment of the conversation and were shorter when the person on whom they had focused talked a lot than when (s)he said very little. After a 2-3 day delay, however, they base their estimates on the amount of the conversation they could remember and estimate that it lasted longer in the former condition than in the latter. These conclusions were confirmed in both simulated conversations and an actual interaction between partners of the opposite sex. Thus, individuals' immediate and delayed estimates of the duration of an interaction can be opposite in direction, and this difference is driven by both the characteristics of the conversation (i.e., speaker dominance) and social and motivational factors that could influence people's focus of attention (i.e., the attractiveness of their conversation partner). (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
All Author(s) ListDong P, Wyer RS
Journal nameJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Year2014
Month1
Day1
Volume Number50
PublisherACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
Pages1 - 14
ISSN0022-1031
eISSN1096-0465
LanguagesEnglish-United Kingdom
KeywordsAttention focus; Impression formation; Physical attractiveness; Social communication; Time estimation
Web of Science Subject CategoriesPsychology; Psychology, Social; PSYCHOLOGY, SOCIAL

Last updated on 2020-24-10 at 02:21