School Leadership and Social Justice: A Conceptual Analysis with Some Observations in Hong Kong
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AbstractSchool leadership has been concerned about how leadership could improve a school, especially manifested in student learning outcomes. Nevertheless, the link between school leadership and inequality of student learning outcome – let alone social justice – is rarely examined in the field. Rather, the issue of educational inequality at school has attracted considerable scholarly attention in Sociology of Education, where one focus is on the impact of what happen in classrooms and staffrooms – e.g., teaching and learning policies – for students’ learning outcomes. Whether a teaching or learning policy is endorsed and whether some teaching practices are implemented rest with the decisions made primarily, if not solely, by school leaders. This suggests that school leaders could play roles in educational inequality. There is definitely a need for empirical or theoretical efforts to examine the implications of the practices of school leaders for educational inequality and thus social justice in the field of school leadership. This paper seeks to take the very first step to fill this gap at a conceptual level with reference to the case of Hong Kong. By referring to some general observations about three existing school practices – student admission, ability grouping, and school discipline – adopted by many school leaders in Hong Kong, this paper underscores that some pragmatic concerns of school leaders posed by the Hong Kong education system in improving a school may have them violate the educational principles of equality, equity, and liberation and thus fail to address social justice.
Acceptance Date17/03/2019
All Author(s) ListYi-Lee Wong, Paula Kwan
All Editor(s) ListRosemary Papa
Book titleHandbook on Promoting Social Justice in Education
Year2019
PublisherSpringer
Pages- - -
ISBN978-3-030-14624-5
LanguagesEnglish-United Kingdom
KeywordsAbility grouping, Hong Kong, School discipline, School rules, Student admission

Last updated on 2019-24-10 at 16:58