Reluctance to talk face-to-face and post on Facebook about politics: Examining the roles of fear of isolation, willingness to self-censor, and network structure
Refereed conference paper presented and published in conference proceedings


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AbstractBased on concepts from spiral of silence theory, this study examines Hong Kong citizen’s willingness to publically express support for a political party or candidate face-to-face and on Facebook during the 2015 District Council elections. Findings from a national survey showed that fear of social isolation (FSI) exhibited an indirect effect on public expression of support through willingness to self-censor (WTSC) for both offline and Facebook contexts. Moreover, there was evidence of moderated mediation for the Facebook condition, such that the indirect effect was stronger for those with more homogeneous Facebook networks. This particular finding is framed in terms of the technological affordances of Facebook (e.g. persistence and scalability of posted messages vis-à-vis spoken communications) as well as increased identifiability and decreased anonymity of Facebook interactions, which accentuate the publicness of political expression and individuals’ fear of social isolation and sensitivity to the opinion climate.
All Author(s) ListCHAN, Che Ming
Name of ConferenceAssociation for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Conference 2016
Start Date of Conference02/08/2016
End Date of Conference07/08/2016
Place of ConferenceMinnesota
Country/Region of ConferenceUnited States of America
Proceedings TitleReluctance to talk face-to-face and post on Facebook about politics: Examining the roles of fear of isolation, willingness to self-censor, and network structure
Year2016
Month8
LanguagesEnglish-United Kingdom

Last updated on 2018-22-01 at 05:59